January 15, 2020 music 0Comment

When I first discovered there was such a thing as “Music For Dogs,” I was kind of shocked I hadn’t come across it sooner. I mean, there is now music and playlists to accompany everything, so of course there’d be one for our favorite four-legged fur-balls (sorry cat lovers). Well, Mr. Puppy was in for a treat because over the next week I’d go on to try an array of made-for-dogs style playlists.

Everyone has their own quintessential summer event. It might be watching the fireworks with friends on the 4th of July, or jumping into the sweet relief of a pool on that absurdly hot day. Maybe you’re still a kid at heart and it’s not really summer until you hear the ice cream truck for the first time. For me, summer was and still is all about road trips: new adventures with old friends and seeing the country from behind a windshield. I may have traded in my Firebird for a Corolla and my high school buddies for a wife and a sheltie, but as long as I have a new playlist ready, the summer road trip remains the same.

Next, reach out to any bands or artists you want to play with and get their availabilities. You should also reach out to local venues to get a sense of what’s open. Ask about either a range of dates or specific days. Making contact to start a conversation is a major step to getting yourself behind the wheel, instead of waiting around for someone to pick you up.

How to fund an art exhibition

You know that wretched feeling you get when it’s 3 AM and you still haven’t begun loading out from the venue, and you have to be up in three hours to make it to your next show in Sacramento?

Jhoni Jackson is an Atlanta-born writer based in San Juan, Puerto Rico. She covers Latinx music and culture for Remezcla, runs a monthly queer party, and also organizes a recurring pop-up feminist bazaar. Until last year, she co-owned a mid-size venue; right now, she’s plotting a new venture. Follow her on Twitter for links to her stories or on Instagram for (mostly) pictures of her cats.

This Devo cover compilation features minusbaby’s fantastic version of “Whip It,” a track that’s worth listening to if you’re thinking about participating in the third installment of Soundfly’s free Chiptune Crash Course series!

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional support and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! That means you’re not just getting the course content, but a coach to bounce ideas off of and someone invested in your success. Check out our courses such as Songwriting for Producers, Beat Making in Ableton Live, and of course The Art of Hip-Hop Production, and preview any or all for free!

Writer’s block can be a burden on any songwriter or artist’s progress. There are no hard and fast rules to songwriting and there are certainly no surefire ways to break out of writer’s block. If you are experiencing a block in your creativity, these steps may help you to rediscover your muse or ignite a creative spark that you’ve never had before. Whatever the case may be, the most important step in breaking out of a songwriter’s block is to keep writing and never give up despite your frustrations. The more you write, the easier it is to write. Share your own methods for breaking out of a creative block below.

2019 rappers list

Of course, you don’t need to know whether your listener wears a raincoat or a windbreaker. You just need to know your listener’s musical experiences, and that’s not that hard to figure out! You can base a lot of that off educated guesses if you know both the target audience you’re writing for, and the basic context of the show or film’s fictional world.

+ Learn a new musical skill in 10 minutes. Explore Soundfly’s wide array of free online courses and gain a musical edge during your lunch break. Or sign up for the Soundfly Weekly newsletter, and learn something new every Tuesday!

Don’t stop learning about music theory and composition just because you’re stuck on the subway! These podcasts can keep your brain active while on the go!

Some of the stuff we’re working on these days (that I can speak of publicly!) is: a massive hip-hop compilation collected by the French producer Kyo Itachi; the first vinyl release of trance producers Hilight Tribe; a new release by the Berlin techno label Get Physical Music; two re-pressings with Rhythm Bomb; and many more.

Let’s examine the guitar more closely. Imagine that the guitar’s low E string has a frequency of 1 Hz. (It’s really 82.4069 Hz; feel free to multiply everything in this next section by that number if you want actual frequencies.) You want your high E string to be tuned two octaves higher than the low one, at 4 Hz. Let’s see if you can get there by tuning the strings pairwise.