November 14, 2019 music 0Comment

“God’s Plan”: Man, the chords in this loop were hard to identify. Not only because the notes here don’t conform to standard A-440 tuning (it’s all about 20 cents sharp of G major), but because they start out as ninth chords whose upper halves are louder and more timbre-distinct than their lower, arpeggio-happy halves. It’s almost like it’s better explained not as “9-chords,” but as “an Em stacked on top of an Am,” and then “a D chord stacked on a G chord.” This “separation” thinking is enhanced by the low-muffled organ patch playing the Am and G, and the more trebly organ patch playing the Em and D.

It wasn’t long before I realized that, if I’m being very honest, all of these playlists are more or less the same. They’re all full of instrumental music (probably because they’re trying to be “calming”) and while the songs aren’t necessarily the same, to the untrained pup ear, they might as well be. There’s not a lot of variation, and if I were a dog, I’d get pretty bored with this mix too. Which might be the point — to just put your pup in a state of relaxation so they can drift off to dreamland.

More and more musicians are choosing to build their own home studios and go it alone these days, as opposed to spending their money on only a few days in a professional studio per year or even less. And that’s great! More agency and self-sufficiency means more time spent honing one’s craft and exploring musical boundaries.

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It’s amazing how you can play something perfectly 20 times in a row and then the moment someone switches on a mic, it all goes down the drain. One of the ways we dealt with this was by taking particularly challenging parts of songs and either breaking them into multiple tracks or separating them out and then re-splicing them together after. It takes all the pressure off getting one perfect take, start to finish.

Sometimes days seem to move just like a big fat man         A

I do give students my opinions on their music, during our in-class, art-school-style critique sessions (and sometimes also as timed SoundCloud comments.) I consider this subjective group critique to be the actually valuable form of feedback. As a group, we listen to each person’s assignment and then talk about it. We try to figure out:

Producers today make as many compositional decisions as entire songwriting teams of yore. How does this affect publishing? Hint: it could use a rethink.

Join us as we recap a year of incredible online learning with our run-down of the best Soundfly student works of 2018! Want in? Mainstage starts next week.

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One of this blog’s most prominent features is the “10 Songs You Need To Hear This Week” which features everyone from YAWNS to Lil Lotus, Cold Hart, Yung Scuff, and more — always aiming to highlight underground artists. Underground Underdogs also does artist features and introspective pieces like “An Insight Into the Experimental Sounds of Cremation Lily” or interviews with artists about their story and success. If you’re a big enough fan you can grab a t-shirt or hoodie and support them.

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Any home-recording musicians, producers, or instrumentalists who are new to working in DAWs, and want to get up and running making music in Logic Pro X, regardless of style or genre. This course will also briefly touch on mixing as part of a more holistic music-making process. You’ll need a copy of Logic Pro X to get the most out of the course.

Student-Artist: Emily McCullough

This is not the place for a ton of different pitches — none of that funk chromaticism. In some tracks, the 808 might only play two notes, and they’re both likely roots. Stick to a range of about an octave maximum.